Solaris error messages L-N

by

104. last message repeated N times
105. ld.so.1:variable: fatal: relocation error: symbol not found:variable
106. ld.so.1: variable: fatal: variable: can’t open file: errno=2
107. le0: Memory error!
108. le0: No carrier– cable disconnected or hub link test disabled?
109. le0: No carrier– transceiver cable problem?
110. LINK COUNT FILE I=i OWNER=o MODE=m SIZE=s MTIME=t  COUNT…  ADJUST?
111. LL105W: Protocol error detected.
112. ln: cannot create /dev/fb: Read-only file system
113. lockd[N]: create_client: no name forinet address 0xN
114. Login incorrect
115. lp hang

M

116. mailtool: Can’t create dead letter: Permission denied
117. mailtool: Could not initialize the Classing Engine
118. Mail Tool is confused about the state of your Mail File.
119. mail: Your mail file was found to be corrupted (Content-length mismatch).
120. Memory address alignment
121. memory leaks
122. mount: /dev/dsk/variable is already mounted, /variable is busy, or…
123. mount: giving up on: /variable
124. mount: mount-point /variable does not exist.
125. mount: the state of /dev/dsk/variable is not okay
N
126. /net/variable: No such file or directory
127. Network is down
128. Networkis unreachable
129. NFS getattr failed for server variable: RPC: Timed out
130. nfs mount: Couldn’t bind to reserved port
131. nfs mount: mount: variable: Device busy
132. NFS mount: /variable mounted OK
133. NFS read failed for server variable
134. nfs_server: bad getargs for N/N
135. NFS server variable not responding still trying
136. NFS server variable ok
137. nfs umount:variable: is busy
138. NFS write error on host variable: No space left on device.
139. NFS write failed for server variable: RPC: Timed out
140. NIS+ authentication failure
141. No buffer space available
142. No child processes
143. No default media available
144. No directory! Logging in with home=/
145. No message of desired type
146. No recipients specified
147. No record locks available
148. No route to host
149. No shell Connection closed
150. No space left on device
151. No such device
152. No such device or address
153. No such file or directory
154. no such map in server’s domain
155. No such process
156. No such user as variable– cron entries not created
157. Not a directory
158. Not enough space
159. not found
160. NOTICE: /variable: out of inodes
161. Not login shell
162. Not on system console
163. Not owner
164. Not supported


last message repeated N times
This message comes from syslog(1M), the facility that prints
messages on the console and records them in /var/adm/messages. To
reduce the log size and minimize buffer usage, syslog collapses
any identical messages it sees during a 20 second period, then
prints this message with the number of repetitions.

Look above this message to see which message was repeated so
often. Then consider the repeated message and take action
accordingly. If repeated log entries such as "su …  failed"
appear, consider the possibility of a security breach.

ld.so.1: variable: fatal: relocation error: symbol not
found:

 variable This message from the run-time linker ld.so.1 indicates that in
trying to execute the application
given after the first colon,
the specified symbol could not be found for relocation. The
message goes on to say in what file the symbol was referenced.
Since this is a fatal error, the application terminates with this
message.

Run the ldd -d command on the application to show its shared
object dependencies and symbols that aren’t found. Probably your
system contains an old version of the shared object that should
contain this symbol. Contact the library vendor or author for an
update.

This error does not necessarily occur when you first bring up an
application. It could take months to develop, if ordinary use of
the application seldom references the undefined symbol.

ld.so.1: variable: fatal: variable: can’t open file:
errno=2

This message indicates that the run-time linker, ld.so.1, while
running the program specified after the first colon, could not
find the shared object specified after the third colon. (A shared
object is sometimes called a dynamically linked library.) Error
number 2 translates to "No such file or directory" (ENOENT).

As a workaround, set the environment variable LD_LIBRARY_PATH to
include the location of the shared object in question, for
example:

/usr/dt/lib:/usr/openwin/lib

Better yet, if you have accessto source code, recompile the
program using the -Rpath loader option. Using LD_LIBRARY_PATH is
discouraged because it slows down performance.

le0: Memory error! This message indicates that the network interface encountered an
access time-out from the CPU’s main memory. There is probably
nothing wrong except system overload.

If the system is busy with other processes, this error can occur
frequently. If possible, try to reduce the system load by
quitting applications or killing some processes.

The Lance Ethernet chip timed out while trying to acquire the bus
for a DVMA transfer. Most network applications wait for a
transfer to occur, so generally no data gets lost. However, data
transfer might fail after too many time-outs.

For more information about the Lance Ethernet chip, see the
le(7D) man page.

le0: No carrier– cable disconnected or hub link test
disabled?

Standalone machines with no Ethernet port connection get this
error when the system triesto access the network. If the
Ethernet cable is disconnected, SPARC machines with the sun4m
architecture usually display this message, whereas machines with
the sun4c architecture usually display the "le0: No carrier–
transceiver cable problem" message instead. If the Ethernet cable
is connected, this message could result from a mismatch between
the machine’s NVRAM settings and the Ethernet hub settings.

If this message is continuous, try to save any workto local
disk.

When a machine is configured as a networked system, it must be
plugged into the Ethernet with a twisted pair J45 connector.

If the Ethernet cable is plugged in, find out whether or not the
Ethernet hub does a Link Integrity Test. Then become superuser to
check and possibly set the machine’s NVRAM. If the hub’s Link
Integrity Test is disabled, set this variable to false.

# eeprom | grep tpe tpe-link-test?=true # eeprom ‘tpe-link-
test?=false’

The default setting is true. If for some reason tpe-link-test?
was set to false,and the hub’s Link Integrity Test is enabled,
set this variable to true.

le0: No carrier– transceiver cable problem?

Standalone machines with no Ethernet port connection get this
error when the system tries to access the network.

If this message is continuous, try to save any work to local
disk.

When a machine is configured as a networked system, it must be
plugged into the Ethernet with either a twisted pair J45
connector or thicknet 10Base-T connector (depending on the
building’s Ethernet cable type).

Older workstations
have a thicknet connection on the back instead
of a twisted pair Ethernet connection, so they require a thicknet
to twisted pair transceiver to translate between cabling types.

LINK COUNT FILE I=i OWNER=o MODE=m SIZE=s MTIME=t
COUNT… ADJUST?

During phase 4, fsck(1M) determined that the inode’s link count
for the specified file is wrong, and asks if you want to adjust
it to the value given.

Generally you can answer yes to this question without harming the
filesystem.

For more information on fsck, see the section on checking
filesystem integrity in the SystemAdministration Guide, Volume
I.

LL105W: Protocol error detected.

This error message comes from Lifeline Mail, an unbundled PC
compatibility application.

The likeliest cause for this problem is that someone set up a
user account without a password. Assign the user a password to
solve this problem.

ln: cannot create /dev/fb: Read-only file system

During device reconfiguration at boot time, the system cannot
link to the frame buffer because /dev is on a read-only
filesystem.

Check that /dev/fb is a symbolic link to the hardware frame
buffer, such as cgsix or tcx. Ensure that the filesystem
containing /dev is mounted read-write.

lockd[N]: create_client: no name forinet address 0xN

This lock daemon message usually indicates that the NIS
hosts.byname and hosts.byaddr maps are not coordinated.

Wait a short time for the maps to synchronize. If they don’t,
takesteps to coordinate them.

For information on updating NIS data, see the section on NIS maps
in the NIS+ and FNS Administration Guide. If you are using the
AnswerBook, "hosts.byaddr" is a good search string.

Login incorrect

This message from the login(1) program indicates an incorrect
combination of login name and password. There is no way to tell
whether what’s wrong is the login name, the password, or both.
Other programs such as ftp(1), rexecd(1M), sulogin(1M), and
uucp(1C) alsogive this error under similar conditions.

Check the /etc/passwd file and the NIS or NIS+ passwd map on the
local system to see if an entry exists for this user. If a user
has simply forgotten the password, su and set a new one with the
passwd usernamecommand. This command automatically updates the
NIS+ passwd map, but with NIS you’ll need to coordinate the
update with the passwd map.

The "Login incorrect" problem can also occur with older versions
of NIS when the user name has more than eight characters. If this
is the case, edit the NIS password file, change the user name to
have eight or fewer characters, and then remake the NIS passwd
map.

If you cannot log in to the system as root, despite knowing the
proper password, it is possible that the /etc/passwd file is
corrupted. Try to log in as a regular user and su to root.

If that doesn’t work, see the message "su: No shell" and follow
most of the instructions given there. Instead of changing the
default shell however, make the password field blank in
/etc/shadow.

lp hang

On a print server, the queue continues to grow but nothing comes
out of the printer.  The printer daemon is hung.

Here is a simple procedure for flushing a hung printing queue:

 1. Login or switch user to root.
 2. Issue the reject printername command to make sure no one
sends any job to the
   printer.
 3. Turn off power to the printer.
 4. If the active job appears to be causing the hang, remove it
from the print queue
   with the cancel jobnumber command, and ask the owner to
requeue that print
   job.
 5. Shut down the print queue with the /usr/lib/lpshut command.
 6. Remove the lock file /var/spool/lp/SCHEDLOCK and the
temporary files
   /var/spool/lp/tmp/*/*.
 7. Turn the printer back on.
 8. Restart the print queue with the /usr/lib/lpsched command.

For more information on print queuing, see the System
Administration Guide, Volume II. If you are using the AnswerBook,
"print server" is a good search string.

mailtool: Can’t create dead letter: Permission denied

An attempt was made to send a message with mailtool(1) from a
directory where the user does not have write permission, and the
user’s home directory is currently unavailable.

Change to another directory and start mailtool again, or use
chmod(1) to change permissions for the directory (if possible).

mailtool: Could not initialize the Classing Engine

When a user runs mailtool(1) on a remote machine, setting the
DISPLAY environment back to the local machine, this message might
appear inside a dialog box window. The dialog box goes on to say
that the Classing Engine must be installed to use Attachments.
This problem occurs because rlogin(1) does not propagate the
user’s environment.

Exit mailtool and set your OPENWINHOME environment variable to
/usr/openwin.  Then run mailtool again. The error message will
not appear, and you will be able to use Attachments.

Classing Engine is a new name for Tool Talk. Earlier versions of
mailtool said "Tool Talk: TT_ERR_NOMP" instead of Classing
Engine.

Mail Tool is confused about the state of your Mail
File.


This message appears in a pop-up dialog box whenever you ask
mailtool(1) to access messages after another mail reader has
modified your inbox. A request follows:  "Please Quit this Mail
Tool."

Click "Continue" to close the dialog box, then exit mailtool. If
you continue trying to read mail, messages deleted by the other
mail reader will never appear, and mailtool will fail to see any
new messages.

mail: Your mailfile was found to be corrupted
(Content-length mismatch).


This message comes from mail(1) or mailx(1) whenever it detects
messages with a different content length than advertised. The
mail program tells you which message might be truncated or might
have another message concatenated to it.

Two common causes of content length mismatches are the
simultaneous use of different mail readers (such as mail and
mailtool), or using a mail reading program (or an editor) that
does not update the Content-Length field after altering a
message.

The mailx program can usually recover from this error and
delineate mail message boundaries correctly. Pay close attention
to the message that might be truncated or combined with another
message, and to all messages after that one. If a mail file
becomes hopelessly corrupted, run it through a text editor to
eliminate all Content-Length lines, and ensure that each message
has a From (no colon) line for each message, preceded by a blank
line.

To avoid mailfile corruption, exit from mailtool without saving
changes when you are currently running mail or mailx.

Memory address alignment

This message can occur when printing large files on a
SPARCprinter attached to a SPARCstation 2.

Replace the SPARCstation 2 CPU with one that isat the most
recent dash level.

memory leaks

An application uses up more and more memory, until all swap space
is exhausted.

Many developers have found that third party software (such as
Purify) can help identify memory leaks in their applications. If
you suspect that you have a memory leak, you can use sar(1) to
check on the Kernel Memory Allocation (KMA). Any driver or module
that uses KMA resources, but does not specifically return the
resources before it exits, can create a memory leak.

For more information on memory leaks, see the section on
monitoring system activity in the System Administration Guide,
Volume II. If you are using the AnswerBook, "displaying disk
usage" is a good search string. Also, see the section on system
resource problems in the NIS+ and FNS Administration Guide.

mount: /dev/dsk/variable is already mounted, /variable
is busy, or…

While trying to mount a filesystem, the mount(1M) command
received a "Device busy" (EBUSY) error code.There are several
possible reasons: this /dev/dsk filesystem is already mounted on
a different directory, the busy path name is the working
directory of an active process, or the system has exceeded its
maximum number of mount points (unlikely).

Run /etc/mount to see if the filesystem is already mounted. If
not, check to see if any shells are active in the busy directory
(did the user cd into the directory?), or if any processes in the
ps(1) listing are active in that directory. If the reason for the
error message isn’t obvious, try using a different directory for
the mount point.

mount: giving up on: /variable

An existing server did not respond to an NFS mount request, so
after retrying a number of times (default1000), the mount(1M)
command has given up. Nonexistent servers or bad mount points
produce different messages.

If the "RPC: Program not registered" message precedes this one,
the requested mount serverprobably did not share (export) any
filesystems, so it has no NFS daemons running. Have the superuser
on the mount server share(1M) the filesystem, then run
/etc/init.d/nfs.server start to begin NFS service.

If the requested mount server is down or slow to respond, check
to see whether the machine needs repair or rebooting.

mount: mount-point /variable does not exist.

Someone tried to mount a filesystem onto the specified directory,
but there is no suchdirectory.

If this is the directory name you want,run mkdir(1) to create
this directory as a mount point.

mount: the state of /dev/dsk/variable is not okay

The system was unable to mount the filesystem that was specified
because the super-block indicates that the filesystem might be
corrupted. This is not an impediment for read-only mounts.

If you don’t need to write on this filesystem, mount(1M) it using
the -o ro option.  Otherwise, do as one of the message
continuation lines suggests and run fsck(1M) to correct the
filesystem state and update the super-block.

For more information on using fsck, see the section on checking
filesystem integrity in the System Administration Guide, Volume
I.

/net/variable: No such file or directory

A user tried to change directory (for example with cd) to a
network partition on the system specified after /net/, but this
host either does not exist or has not shared (exported) any
filesystem.

To gain access to files on this system, try rlogin(1).

To export filesystems from the remote system, become superuser on
that system and run the share(1M) command with the appropriate
options. If that system is sharing filesystems for the first
time, also run /etc/init.d/nfs.server start to begin NFS service.

Network is down

A transport connection failed because it encountered a dead
network.

Report this error to the system administrator for the network. If
you are the person responsible for this network, check to see why
the network is dead and what repairs are necessary.

This error results from status information delivered by the
underlying communication interface.

The symbolic name for this error is ENETDOWN, errno=127.

Network is unreachable

An operational error occurred either because there was no route
to the network or because negative status information was
returned by intermediate gateways or switching nodes.

The returned status is not always sufficient to distinguish
between a network that is down and a host that is down. See the
"No route to host" message.

Check the network routers and switches to see if they are
disallowing these packet transfers. If they areallowing all
packet transfers, check network cablingand connections.

The symbolic name for this error is ENETUNREACH, errno=128.

NFS getattr failed for server variable: RPC: Timed out

This message appears on an NFS client that requested a service
from an NFS server whose hardware is failing. Often the message
"NFS read failed" appears along with this message. If the server
were merely down or slow to respond, the "NFS server not
responding" message would appear instead. Data corruption on the
server system is possible.

Because this message usually indicates server hardware failure,
initiate repair procedures as soon as possible. Check the memory
modules, disk controllers, and CPU board.

For more information on NFS tuning, see chapter on monitoring
network performance in the System Administration Guide, Volume
II.

nfs mount: Couldn’t bind to reserved port

This message appears when a client attempts to NFS mount a
filesystem from a server that has more than one Ethernet
interface configured on the same physical subnet.

Always connect multiple Ethernet interfaces on one router system
to different physical subnetworks.

nfs mount: mount: variable: Device busy

This message appears when the superuser attempts to NFS mount on
top of an active directory. The busy device is actually the
working directory of a process.

Determine which shell on the workstation is currently located
below the mount point, and change out of that directory. Be wary
of subshells (such as su shells) that could be in different
working directories while the parents remain below the mount
point.

NFS mount: /variable mounted OK

While booting, the system failed to mount the directory specified
after the first colon, probably because the NFS server involved
was down or slow to respond. The mount ran in the background and
successfully contacted the NFS server.

This is a purely informative message to let you know that the
mount process has completed.

NFS read failed for server variable

This is generally a permissions problem. Perhaps a directory or
file permission was changed while the client held the file open.
Perhaps the filesystem’s share or netgroup permissions changed.
If the server were down or the network saturated, the "NFS server
not responding" message would appear instead.

Log in to the NFS server and check the permissions of directories
leading to the file.  Make certain that the filesystem is shared
with (exported to) the client experiencing an NFS read failure.

For more information, see the chapter on NFS troubleshooting in
the NFS Administration Guide.

nfs_server: bad getargs for N/N

This message comes from the NFS server when it gets a request
with unrecognized or incorrect arguments. Typically, it means the
request could not be XDR decoded properly. This can result from
corruption of the packet over the network, or from an
implementation bug causing the NFS client to improperly encode
its arguments.

If this message originates from a single client, investigate that
machine for NFS client software bugs. If this message appears all
over a network, especially accompanied by other networking
errors, investigate the network cabling and connectors.

NFS server variable not responding still trying

In mostcases this very common message indicates that the system
has requested a service from an NFS server that is either down or
extremely slow to respond. In some cases this message indicates
that the network link to this NFS server is broken, although
usually that condition generates other error messages as well. In
a few cases this message indicates NFS client set-up problems.

Check the non-responding NFS server to see whether the machine
needs repair or rebooting. Encourage your user community to
report such problems quickly but only once.

Should this message appear when booting a diskless client, make
sure that the client’s /etc/hosts file and the network naming
service (NIS, NIS+, or other /etc/hosts files on the network)
have been updated.

Formore information, see the chapter on NFS troubleshooting in
the NFS Administration Guide.

NFS server variable ok

This message is the follow-up to the "NFS server not responding"
error. It indicates that the NFS server is back in operation.

When an NFS server first comes up, it will be busy fulfilling
client requests for a while. Be patient and wait for your client
system to respond. Making many extraneous requests only further
slows the NFS server response time.

nfs umount:variable: is busy

This message appears when the superuser attempts to unmount an
active NFS filesystem. The busy point is the working directory of
a process.

Determine which shell (or process) on the workstation is
currently located in the remotely mounted filesystem, and change
(cd) out of that directory. Be wary of subshells (such as su
shells) that could be in different directories while the parent
shells remain in the NFS filesystem.

NFS write error on host variable: No space left on
device.

This console message indicates that an NFS-mounted partition has
filled up and cannot accept writing of new data. Unfortunately,
software that attempts to overwriteexisting files will usually
zero out all data in these files. This is particularly
destructive on NFS-mounted /home partitions.

Find the user or process that is filling up the filesystem, and
get the out-of-control process stopped as soon as you can. Then
delete files as necessary to create more space on the filesystem
(large core files are good candidates for deletion). Have users
write any modified files to local disk if possible. If this error
occurs often, redistribute directories to ease demandon this
partition.

For more information on disk usage, see the System Administration
Guide, Volume II.  If you are using the AnswerBook, "managing
disk use" is a good search string.

NFS write failed for server variable: RPC: Timed out

This error can occur when a file system is soft-mounted, and
server or network response time lags. Any data written to the
server during this period could be corrupted.

If you intend to write on a filesystem, never specify the soft
mount option. Use the default hard mount for all the filesystems
that are mounted read-write.

For more information, see the chapter on NFS troubleshooting in
the NFS Administration Guide.

NIS+ authentication failure

This is a Federated Naming Service message. The operation could
not be completed because the principal making the request could
not be authenticated with the name service involved.

Run the nisdefaults(1) command to verify that you are identified
as the correct NIS+ principal. Also check that the system has
specified the correct public key source.

For more information, see the authentication and authorization
overview in the NIS+ and FNS Administration Guide.

No buffer space available

An operation on a transport endpoint or pipe was not performed
because the system lacked sufficient buffer space or because a
queue was full. The target system probably ran out of memory or
swap space. Any data written during this condition will probably
be lost.

To add more swap area, use the swap -a command on the target
system.  Alternatively, reconfigure the target system to have
more swap space. As a general rule, wwap space should be two to
three times as large as physical memory.

The symbolic name for this error is ENOBUFS,errno=132.

No child processes

This message can appear when an application tries to communicate
with cooperating process that do not exist.

Restart the parent process so it can create the child processes
again. If that doesn’t help, this could be the result of
programming error; contact the vendor or author of the program
for an update.

A wait(2) system call was executed by a process that had no
existing or unwaited-for child processes. The child processes
could have exited prematurely, or might never have been created.

The symbolic name for this error is ECHILD, errno=10.

No default media available

The volume manager issues this message if a user makes an
eject(1) request when the drives containno diskette or CDROM to
eject.

Insert a diskette or CDROM. If the volume manager is confused and
there actually is a diskette or CDROM in a drive, run volcheck to
update the volume manager. If the system remains confused, try
booting with the -r option to reconfigure devices.

No directory! Logging in with home=/

The login(1) program could not find the home directory listed in
the password file or NIS passwd map, so it deposited the user in
the root directory.

Check that the user’s home directory is mounted and is owned by
and accessible to that user. Perhaps the automounter tried to
mount the home directory, but the NFS server did not respond
quicklyenough. Try listing the files in /home/username. If the
NFS server responds to this request, have the user log out and
log in again.

It is possible that the automounter daemon is not running. Run
the ps command to see if automountd is present. If not,run the
second command; if it appears to be wedged, run both these
commands:

# /etc/init.d/autofs stop # /etc/init.d/autofs start

When the automounter daemon is running, verify that the
/etc/auto_master file has a line like this:

/home  auto_home

Verify that the /etc/auto_home file has a line like this:

+auto_home

These entries depend on the NIS auto_home map.

It is also possible that the NFS server has not shared (exported)
this /home directory, or that the NFS daemons on the server have
disappeared.

For more information on NFS, see the NFS Administration Guide.

No message of desired type

An attempt was made to receive a message of a type that does not
exist on the specified message queue. See the msgop(2) man page
for details.

This indicates an error in the System V IPC message facility.
Generally the message queue is empty or devoid of the desired
message type, while IPC_NOWAIT is set.

The symbolic name for this error is ENOMSG, errno=35.

No recipients specified

This message comes from the mailx(1) command whenever a user
doesn’t provide an address in the To: field.

See the message "Recipient names must be specified" for details.

No record locks available

No more record locks are available. The system lock table is
full.

The symbolic name for this error is ENOLCK, errno=46.

Perhaps a process called fcntl(2) with the F_SETLK or F_SETLKW
option, and the system maximum was exceeded. The system contains
several different locking subsystems, including fcntl,the NFS
lock daemon, and mail locking, all of which can produce this
error.

Try again later, when more locks might be available.

No route to host

An operational error occurred because there was no route to the
destination host, or because of status information returned by
intermediate gateways or switching nodes.

The returned status is not always sufficient to distinguish
between a host that is down and a network that isdown. See the
"Network is unreachable" message.

Check the network routers and switches to see if they are
disallowing these packet transfers. If they are allowing all
packet transfers, check network cabling and connections.

The symbolic name for thiserror is EHOSTUNREACH, errno=148.

No shell Connection closed

A user has attempted to remote login to the system, and has a
valid account name and password, but the shell specified for
their account is not available on that system. For example, the
seventh field could request the GNUBourne-again shell /bin/bash,
which does not exist on standard Solaris distributions.

If you have a copy of the requested shell, become superuser and
install the missing shell on that system. Otherwise, change the
user’s password file entry (perhaps only in the NIS+ or NIS
passwd map) to specify an available shell such as /bin/csh or
/bin/ksh.

No space left on device

While writing an ordinary file or creating a directory entry,
there was no free space left on the device. The disk, tape, or
diskette is full of data. Any data written to that device during
this condition will be lost.

Remove unneeded files from the hard disk or diskette until there
is space for all the data you are writing. It might be advisable
to move some directories onto another filesystem and create
symbolic links accordingly. When a tape is full, continue on
another one, use a higher density setting, or obtain a higher-
capacity tape.

To create multi-volume tapes or diskettes, use the pax(1) or
cpio(1) command; tar(1) is still limited to a single volume.

The symbolic name for this error is ENOSPC, errno=28.

No such device

An attempt was made to apply an operation to an inappropriate
device, such as writing to a nonexistent device.

Look in the /devices directory to see why this device does not
exist, or why the program expects it to exist. The similar "No
such device or address" message tends to indicate I/O problems
with an existing device, whereas this message tends to indicate a
device that does not exist at all.

The symbolic name for this error is ENODEV, errno=19.

No such device or address

This can occur when a tape drive is off-line or when a device has
been powered off or removed from thesystem.

For tape drives, make sure the device is connected, powered on,
and toggled on-line (if applicable). For disk and CDROM drives,
check that the device is connected and powered on.

With all SCSI devices, ensure that the target switch or dial is
set to the number where the system originally mounted it. To
inform the system of a change to the target device number, reboot
using the -r (reconfigure) option.

This message results from I/O to a special file’s subdevice that
either does not exist or that exists beyond the limit of the
device.

The symbolic name for this error is ENXIO, errno=6.

No such file or directory

The specified file or directory does not exist. Either the file
name or path name was entered incorrectly.

Check the file name and path name for correctness and try again.
If the specified file or directory is a symbolic link, it
probably points to a nonexistent file or directory.

The symbolic name for this error is ENOENT, errno=2.

no such map in server’s domain

A user or an application tried to look up something using Network
Information
Services (NIS), but NIS has no corresponding database
for this request.

Make sure the NIS map name is spelled correctly. To see a list of
nicknames for the various NIS maps, run the ypcat -x command. To
see a full list of the various NIS maps (databases), run the
ypwhich -m command. If the NIS service were not running on the
current machine, these commands would result in a "can’t
communicate with ypbind" message.

No such process

This process cannot be found. The process could have finished
execution and disappeared, or it might still be in thesystem
under a different numeric ID.

Use the ps(1) command tocheck that the process ID you’re
supplying is correct.

No process corresponds to the specified process ID (PID), light-
weight process ID, or thread_t.

The symbolic name for this error is ESRCH, errno=3.

No such user as variable– cron entries not created

A file exists in /var/spool/cron/crontabs for the specified user,
but this user is not in /etc/passwd or the NIS passwd map. The
system cannot create cron entries for nonexistent users.

To eliminate this message at boot time, remove the cron file for
the nonexistent user, or rename it if the user’s login name has
changed. If this is a valid user, create an appropriate password
entry for this name.

Not a directory

A non-directory was specified where a directory is required, such
as in a path prefix or as an argument to the chdir(2) system
call.

Look at a listing of all the files in the current directory and
try again, specifying a directory instead of a file.

The symbolic name for this error is ENOTDIR, errno=20.

Not enough space

This message indicates that the system is running many large
applications simultaneously, and has run out ofswap space
(virtual memory). It could also indicate that applications failed
without freeing pages from the swap area. Swap space is an area
of disk set aside to store portions of applications and data not
immediately required in memory. Any data written during this
condition will probably be lost.

Reinstall or reconfigure the system to have more swap space. A
general rule of thumb is that swap space should be two to three
times as large as physical memory.  Alternatively, use mkfile(1M)
and swap(1M) to add more swap area. This example shows how to add
16 MB of virtual memory in the /usr/swap file (any filesystem
with enough free space would work):

# mkfile 16m /usr/swap # swap -a /usr/swap

To make this automatic at boot time, add the following line to
the /etc/vfstab file:

/usr/swap   –   –   swap   –  
no  -

In calling the fork(2), exec(2), sbrk(2), or malloc(3C) routine,
a program asked for more memory than the system could supply.
This is not a temporary condition; swap space is a system
parameter.

The symbolic name for this error is ENOMEM, errno=12.

not found

This message indicates that the Bourne shell could not find the
program name given as a command.

Check the form and spelling of the command line. If that looks
correct, echo $PATH to see if the user’s search path is correct.
When communications are garbled, it is possible to unset a search
path to such an extent that only built-in shell commands are
available. Here is a command to reset a basic search path:

$ PATH=/usr/bin:/usr/ccs/bin:/usr/openwin/bin:.

If the search path looks correct, check the directory contents
along the search path to see if programs are missing or if
directories are not mounted.

NOTICE: /variable: out of inodes

The filesystem specified after the first colon probably contains
many small files, exceeding the per-filesystem limit for inodes
(file information nodes).

If many small files were created unintentionally, removing them
will resolve the problem.

Otherwise, follow these steps to increase filesystem capacity for
small files. Make several backup copies of the filesystem on
different tapes (for safety), then bring the machine down to
single-user mode. Use the newfs(1M) command with the -i option to
increase inode density for this filesystem. Here is an example:

# newfs -i 1024 /dev/rdsk/partition

Finally, restore the filesystem from a backup tape. Note that
increasing the inode density slightly reduces total filesystem
capacity.

Not login shell

This message results when a user triesto logout(1) from a shell
other than the one started at login time.

To quit a non-login shell, use the exit(1) command. Continue
doing so until you have logged out.

For more general information on the login shell, see the section
on customizing your work environment in the Solaris Advanced
User’s Guide.

Not on system console

A user tried to login(1) to a system as the superuser (uid=0,
which is not necessarily root) from a terminal other than the
console.

Login to that system as a normal user, then run su(1M) to become
superuser. To allow superuser logins from any terminal, comment
out the CONSOLE line in /etc/default/login (this is not
recommended for security reasons).

Not owner

Either an ordinary user tried to do something reserved for the
superuser, or the user tried to modify a file in a way restricted
to the file’s owner or to the superuser.

Switch user to root and try again.

The symbolic name for this error is EPERM, errno=1.

Not supported

This version of the system does not support the feature
requested, although future versions of the system might provide
support.

This is generally not a system message from the kernel, but an
error returned by an application. Contact the vendor or author of
the application for an update.

The symbolic name for this error is ENOTSUP, errno=48.

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